Sedating histamine

Rated 4.61/5 based on 594 customer reviews

Sedating antihistamines have the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, the ability to bind to non-histamine receptors and have less selectivity for peripheral or central H1-receptors.The most common adverse effects with sedating antihistamines are sedation, dizziness and incoordination.Please see package insert for additional information and possible updates.The authors make no claims of the accuracy of the information contained herein; and these suggested doses are not a substitute for clinical judgment. nor any other party involved in the preparation of this program shall be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary damages resulting in whole or part from any user's use of or reliance upon this material.

This includes conditions such as: Other conditions such as hyper-reactive (vasomotor) rhinitis and pruritus of any cause are commonly treated with antihistamines, although there is little evidence that histamine plays a contributory role.

There is little evidence that antihistamines used symptomatically to treat nonspecific itching have any effect greater than placebo.

Most of the second-generation antihistamines have been shown to benefit chronic idiopathic urticaria.

[ Read the disclaimer | Adults: Allergic rhinitis, seasonal/perennial: 5 mg po qd. In patients with liver or renal impairment, a starting dose of one 5 mg tablet every other day is recommended based on pharmacokinetic data.

Mechanism of Action Desloratadine is a long-acting tricyclic histamine antagonist with selective H1-receptor histamine antagonist activity.

Leave a Reply